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USAID USPSC Food for Peace Officer/Senior Food for Peace Officer

Website USAID/Food for Peace

FFP predicts, prevents, and responds to hunger overseas.

Please cite PCDN as the source of the posting in your application. 

The U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office of Food for Peace (FFP) is the largest provider of food assistance in the world. FFP works together with others to reduce hunger and malnutrition and assure that adequate, safe and nutritious food is available, accessible to and well-utilized by all individuals at all times to support a healthy and productive life. Each year on average, FFP provides more than $2 billion of food assistance, reaching 45-55 million beneficiaries in approximately 50 countries.

FFP works in both emergency and development contexts, with emergency and recovery activities comprising 80 percent of total spending. Through its emergency activities, FFP strives to provide food assistance to save lives, reduce suffering and support the early recovery of populations affected by both conflict and natural disasters.

FFP also recognizes that repeatedly responding to emergencies is not sufficient to end hunger and increase food security. FFP development activities help chronically food insecure populations reduce their long-term need for food assistance by strengthening the capacity of developing societies to ensure access to food for their most vulnerable communities and individuals, especially women and children. FFP also helps individuals and communities better withstand future shocks through resilience-building activities.

FFP works closely with many other parts of USAID, especially the Bureau for Food Security, which plays a key role in implementing the President’s Feed the Future initiative, and the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), which leads on disaster response around the world. Food for Peace employs a staff of over 100 in Washington and also has officers posted abroad.

More Information on FFP is available at: https://www.usaid.gov/food-assistance

Core Areas of Responsibility:

At the GS-11 level, the incumbent serves as a Food for Peace Officer (FFPO). The primary role of the FFPO working at the GS-11 level will be to support a Senior Food for Peace Officer (SFFPO) in the management of one or more country portfolios.

At the GS-12 and GS-13 levels, the primary roles of the FFPO and the SFFPO are to analyze food needs, recommend and implement food security strategies, and manage FFP food assistance programs carried out by implementing partners. These partners are predominantly Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs) and Public International Organizations (PIOs) such as the United Nations World Food Program (UN/WFP) in one or more countries.

As part of a Geographic Team, the incumbent will carry out the following functions for assigned countries:

At the GS-11 Equivalent level:

  • With technical guidance from her/his supervisor and the SFFPO, serve as secondary point of contact for the U.S. Government (USG), implementing partners, and others on food assistance issues for the assigned country or countries;
  • Under the direction of her/his supervisor and the SFFPO, assess food needs based on a variety of sources, including field assessments, technical data, early warning information, and reporting from USAID field staff, PVOs, and PIOs;
  • Under the direction of her/his supervisor and working in collaboration with the SFFPO, identify priorities for funding, review appeals and proposals, and recommend programs to support. Draft and assemble documentation for program approval and funding;
  • With technical guidance from her/his supervisor and the SFFPO, monitor programs through field visits, reports by field staff, and information provided by implementing partners to maximize program effectiveness and ensure programs are implemented in a manner consistent with policy and legislative guidelines;
  • For review by her/his supervisor and the SFFPO, draft information products (e.g., updates, memoranda) on food security conditions and FFP programs, and support the SFFPO to prepare briefings plus represent FFP in meetings and/or working groups with other USAID colleagues and other agency representatives;
  • Accompany the SFFPO or other FFP staff on overseas trips in order to perform tasks and activities to support the duties and responsibilities above; and
  • Represent FFP on the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance’s (DCHA) Crisis and Opening Action Coordination Team (COACT) and if applicable, serve on detail to DCHA’s Program, Policy and Management (PPM) team when tasked to serve as FFP’s policy advisor on food

At the GS-12 Equivalent level:

  • In close coordination with her/his supervisor, serve as primary point of contact for the USG, implementing partners, and others on food assistance issues;
  • Under the direction of her/his supervisor, assess food needs based on a variety of sources, including field assessments, technical data, early warning information, and reports from USAID field staff, PVOs, and PIOs;
  • Under the direction of her/his supervisor, identify priorities for funding, review appeals and proposals, and recommend programs to support. Draft and assemble documentation for program approval and funding;
  • With guidance from her/his supervisor, monitor programs through field visits, reports by field staff, and information provided by implementing partners to maximize program effectiveness and ensure programs are implemented in a manner consistent with policy and legislative guidelines;
  • Draft information products (e.g., updates, memoranda) on food security conditions and FFP programs, provide briefings, plus represent FFP in meetings and/or working groups with other USAID colleagues and other agency representatives;
  • Travel overseas to perform tasks and activities to support the duties and responsibilities outlined above; and
  • Represent FFP on the COACT and if applicable, serve on detail to the PPM team when tasked to serve as FFP’s policy advisor on food

At the GS-13 Equivalent level:

  • Serve as primary point of contact for the USG, implementing partners, and others on FFP-funded programming and other food assistance issues;
  • Assess food needs based on a variety of sources, including field assessments, technical data, early warning information, and reports from USAID field staff, PVOs, and PIOs;
  • Identify priorities for funding, review appeals and proposals, and recommend programs to support. Draft and assemble documentation for program approval and funding;
  • Monitor developments in assigned countries and programs to identify food assistance response options and/or policy issues related to food assistance, and make program or policy recommendations to FFP leadership;
  • Develop, monitor, evaluate programs through field visits, reports from field staff, and information provided by implementing partners to maximize program effectiveness and ensure programs are implemented in a manner consistent with policy and legislative guidelines. Recommend performance measures for country programs and individual projects;
  • Draft and/or edit information products (e.g., updates and memoranda) on food security situations and FFP programs, provide briefings, plus represent FFP in meetings and/or working groups with other USAID colleagues and other agency representatives;
  • Represent FFP on possible longer-term travel to overseas ‘duty stations’ to support the above duties and responsibilities;
  • Mentor/train incoming FFPOs on specifics of FFP authorizing and appropriating legislation, interpretation, and office procedures, when required; and
  • Represent FFP on the COACT and if applicable, serve on detail to the PPM team when tasked to serve as FFP’s policy advisor on food

The incumbent at all three GS levels may also be assigned to serve as an Emergency Policy Analyst and Program Coordinator or Program Operations Specialist with FFP’s Policy and Technical Division (PTD) or Program Operations Division (POD) or serve on a Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) or a Response Management Team (RMT) with OFDA.

Food for Peace Officers are expected to spend 10 percent of their time contributing to organizational learning activities, attending trainings, and/or mentoring FFP staff.

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