Brandeis Horizontal Green/Blue
Upeace fall 2017
Bay Path 2017 Horizontal
NOVA Horizontal
Amani Horizontal

Unique opportunity to learn about the Impact of Agriculture on Air Quality and Climate

Home Forums Training Opportunities, Conferences and Events Unique opportunity to learn about the Impact of Agriculture on Air Quality and Climate

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Profile photo of  Anonymous 2 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #97038
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    * Note that this course is also available Online

    * Click here for registration

    Unique opportunity to learn about the Impact of Agriculture on Air Quality and Climate

    Agricultural air quality is an important emerging area of environmental science, which offers significant challenges to many aspects of research, policy and regulatory frameworks. Agricultural emissions produce significant local, regional and global impacts, such as odor, Particulate Matter (PM) exposure, eutrophication, acidification, climate, exposure to toxics, and pathogens.

    Excess reactive nitrogen threatens the quality of air, soil, and water; with implications for human health and the environment. It also contributes to the global problems caused by nitrous oxide greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural emissions are variable in space and time. Most important in the US are ammonia (where agriculture accounts for ~90% of total emissions), reduced sulphur (unquantified), PM2.5 (~16%), PM10 (~18%), methane (29%), nitrous oxide (72%); and odor and emissions of pathogens (both unquantified).

    Reactive nitrogen inputs in India and the world have been increasing, largely due to human activities associated with food production and fossil fuel combustion. Despite the obvious benefits of a plentiful supply of food and energy, the adverse consequences associated with the accumulation of reactive nitrogen in the environment are large.

    Nitrogen pollution poses an even greater challenge than carbon, because once a new reactive nitrogen molecule is created, it can, in sequence, travel throughout the environment contributing to major environmental problems i.e. the nitrogen cascade. There is a need for an integrated nitrogen management strategy and new policies that cover these concerns; while simultaneously challenging the scientific community to continue quantifying the benefits of nitrogen mitigation.

    For further queries, please contact Dr. Chubamenla Jamir ( chubamenla.jamir@teriuniversity.ac.in ) Prof Suresh Jain ( sureshj@teriuniversity.ac.in )

    For feedback and queries please contact us at webinar@teriuniversity.ac.in

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.


Upeace fall 2017
NOVA Horizontal
Brandeis Horizontal Green/Blue
Georgetown Horizontal 2