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Request for Proposals: Apply for Doctoral, Post-Doctoral and Junior Faculty Research Fellowship, International Center on Nonviolent Conflict

Home Forums Scholarship, Fellowship Opportunities and Academic Programs Request for Proposals: Apply for Doctoral, Post-Doctoral and Junior Faculty Research Fellowship, International Center on Nonviolent Conflict

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    Craig Zelizer
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    Request for Proposals: Apply for Doctoral, Post-Doctoral and Junior Faculty Research Fellowship

    (This is a sponsored post on PCDN)

    Now OPEN

    Visit the ICNC Research Fellowship page to learn more about the program.

    ICNC now offers an expanded stipend opportunity for Ph.D. students and Post-Doctoral and Junior Faculty. ICNC’s Doctoral, Post-Doctoral and Junior Faculty Research Fellowship enables eligible applicants to carry out research on civil resistance and/or conduct a study that can benefit from a civil resistance perspective, as part of their dissertation or for an upcoming book, journal article or book chapter.

    For 2017, $20,000 in total has been allotted for the program. Each fellowship award will be between $2,000 and $10,000. The deadline to apply is April 9, 2017.

    In addition to a stipend, the fellowship includes several hours of scholarly mentorship provided by one of the ICNC’s Academic Council members. Mentorship is set up when ICNC matches an awardee with an academic advisor interested in the awardee’s research topic.

    Past Awardees

    Fellowship Goals
    The Research Fellowship aims to support:

    • In-depth analysis of civil-resistance-related literature; with relevant findings incorporated into fellows’ writings;
    • Fieldwork (data collection) related to civil resistance case studies;
    • Archival work to recover information about civil resistance or case histories of civil resistance;
    • Writing on civil resistance for a peer-review publication

    Fellowship Requirements
    Once the fellowship is awarded, research fellows are expected to:

    • Deliver regularly scheduled reports on the progress of the ICNC supported research
    • Produce, by the end of the fellowship, at least one written draft of a journal article, book manuscript, or book chapter relevant to civil resistance that will be submitted as part of a peer-review publication or to a peer-review outlet by the end of the fellowship

    Eligible Applicants

    • Junior faculty on a tenure-track position and not yet tenured
    • Part-time and full-time post-doctoral researchers. In exceptional circumstances, we can consider applications from post-doctoral candidates who are currently unemployed and unaffiliated but who can demonstrate that they are actively looking for employment in their area of specialization
    • Lecturers or assistant professors who are working to secure a permanent faculty appointment, or to advance to an associate professor or a senior lecturer position

    Eligibility Criteria
    Ph.D. students:

    • Studies at accredited university inside or outside of his/her home country
    • Has completed at least 12 months of Ph.D. studies before the date of the application
    • Has at least 18 months remaining –from the date of the submission of the application for the ICNC stipend program– to complete and submit a doctoral dissertation
    • Has a Ph.D. thesis that can be enriched by integrating a new or more in-depth analysis of one of the priority research topics in civil resistance listed below. Strong proposals focusing on the additional themes of interest to ICNC listed below will also be considered
    • Demonstrates in the application a good command and understanding of the civil resistance literature and its relevance to his/her work

    Post-Doctoral & Junior Faculty:Laurence Delina Phd Fellowship-01

    • Has completed his/her Ph.D. in the last 5 years
    • Has a part-time or full-time teaching or research appointment at a nationally accredited academic institution. In exceptional circumstances, we can consider applications from post-doctoral candidates that are currently unemployed and unaffiliated but that can demonstrate that they are actively looking for employment in their area of specialization.
    • Has started or is continuing work on a peer-review publication that could be enriched or benefit from an in-depth theoretical or empirical civil resistance perspective—focusing in particular on one of the priority research topics in civil resistance listed below. Strong proposals focusing on the additional themes of interest to ICNC listed below will also be considered
    • Demonstrates a good command and understanding of the civil resistance literature and its relevance to his/her work

    How to Apply
    Applicants need to fill out the online application form, which requires:

    For Ph.D. applicants:

    1. A copy of the most current Ph.D. transcript indicating grades earned thus far

    2. A department or supervisor’s letter indicating applicant’s current year of Ph.D. studies and the expected date (month/year) of the thesis completion and submission

    3. A 1,000-word Ph.D. thesis proposal which clearly explains: 1) how the Ph.D. research conducted so far can benefit from a new or greater focus on civil resistance; 2) how a selected civil resistance focus relates to at least one of the priority research topics; and 3) how the stipend on civil resistance will help enhance both the applicant’s thesis and contribute to the field of civil resistance more broadly;

    4. A 1000-word literature review on civil resistance, highlighting works on civil resistance that the applicant sees as most pertinent and explaining their theoretical and empirical relevance to, and significance for, arguments, analysis, findings and/or cases that are part of the applicant’s Ph.D. thesis or future peer-review publication. Prior to preparing the literature review applicants are strongly encouraged to review the following resources:

    5. Budget justification with a detailed budget proposal for research that contains expected costs and an explanation of how the requested funds will be used to support or conduct the research. The ICNC fellowship does not support tuition expenses. The ICNC fellowships range between $2,000 and $10,000.

    6. Most recent CV

    7. A writing sample of no more than 1,000 words that has not been published. [should not include a literature review submitted for this application]

    For Post-Doctoral and Junior Faculty applicants:

    1. A letter from the university/department confirming their appointment as a part-time or full-time faculty

    2. A 1,000-word proposal for a journal article, book or another peer-review publication that clearly explains: 1) how the writing can benefit from a new or greater focus on civil resistance; 2) how a selected civil resistance focus relates to at least one of the priority research topics; and 3) how the ICNC stipend will help enhance the quality of the publication and contribute to the field of civil resistance more broadly;

    3. A 1000-word literature review on civil resistance, highlighting works on civil resistance that the applicant sees as most pertinent and explaining their theoretical and empirical relevance to, and significance for, arguments, analysis, findings and/or cases that are part of the applicant’s Ph.D. thesis or future peer-review publication. Prior to preparing the literature review applicants are strongly encouraged to review the following resources:

    4. Budget justification with a detailed budget proposal for research that contains expected costs and an explanation of how the requested funds will be used to support or conduct the research. The ICNC fellowship does not support tuition expenses. The ICNC fellowships range between $2,000 and $10,000.

    5. Most recent CV

    6. A writing sample of no more than 1,000 words that has not been published. [should not include a literature review submitted for this application]

    Application Deadline
    The deadline for application submissions is April 9, 2017.

    Apply now

    Fellowship Disbursement
    The fellowship will be disbursed in installments. The installments will be made based on an agreed-upon schedule for the submission of relevant assessments and drafts, leading up to the completion of a written draft for a peer review publication.

    Each installment will be made contingent upon positive evaluation of the submitted work and satisfactory progress toward completion of the thesis and/or of the written draft for a peer-review publication.

    Research Topics Currently of Interest to ICNC
    ICNC priority research topics that applicants are strongly encouraged to consider as part of their applications for the stipend include:

    ICNC Priority Research Topics in Civil Resistance:

    1. The role and impact of civil resistance before, during, and after political transitions
    2. The relationship between pre-figurative and intra-movement dynamics and the broader political, social and/or economic impacts of nonviolent movements
    3. Why and how civil resistance movements maintain nonviolent discipline
    4. The role and impact of a variety of external actors in civil resistance struggles
    5. Nonviolent resistance strategies to reduce societal violence and/or marginalize violent non-state actors (i.e. criminal groups; militias and paramilitaries engaged in civil war; extremist and terrorist groups)
    6. Assessing the impact of civil resistance knowledge and skills acquisition on civil resistance movements
    7. The impact of women in civil resistance movements
    8. Civil resistance strategies to fight climate change
    9. The role of emotions in movement emergence and civil resistance
    10. Why some nonviolent movements are hijacked by violent flanks and how nonviolent movements interact with violent movements and can plan better to prevent violent groups from taking over
    11. Civil resistance and how it can contribute to peacebuilding
    12. The impact of civil resistance on defections from supporters of a movement’s opponent such as members of the business community, banks and finance, bureaucracy, religious organizations, members of the security forces, state-controlled media, and other pillars of support
    13. Strategies for civil resistance campaigns against abusive or unaccountable practices involving multinational corporations—where and how do movements and their allies target or pressure; what strategies, tactics, and framing are most effective; etc.?
    14. Popular grassroots movements on the margins (landless peoples, unemployed, underprivileged) that demand inclusion, an end to discrimination, access to resources and better services in a nominal democracy
    15. How have nonviolent activists and movements in nondemocracies overcome the scarcity of material resources in past nonviolent movements? How did they generate material resources, conduct successful grassroots fund-raising efforts, and manage their financial and material resources and needs in adversarial conditions?
    16. Civil resistance and nonviolent resistance campaigns in democracies that experience raising waives of anti-democratic populism and growing authoritarian practices

    Additional themes of interest:

    1. Study of intersectionality between broad based pro-democracy movements and non-traditional, under-represented movements and groups such as LGBT, or ethnic minorities
    2. Why some actors choose nonviolent resistance and others resort to violent means
    3. Assessment tools for movements—how do movements assess their current state and progress over time?
    4. How do localized protests, and everyday resistance, turn into national political movements?
    5. Analysis of strategic approaches to sustaining movements and building resilience, despite fear and apathy
    6. The role and impact of civil resistance on peoples’ and states’ identities and/or aspirations
    7. Civil resistance and negotiations
    8. Different forms of leadership in civil resistance
    9. Civil resistance and international law—Are acts of civil resistance protected under international law? How can civil resistance impact international law?
    10. Nonviolent national defense (sometimes referred to as civilian-based defense)
    11. National or local surveys on the potential for, and effectiveness of, civil resistance methods in war-torn societies
    12. The role of constructive programs and alternative institution building in civil resistance
    13. Review of studies across disciplines about the onset of civil resistance movements under repressive conditions using a civil resistance perspective
    14. Conceptual analysis and empirical study of the formation of diverse social coalitions as part of civil resistance movements
    15. Civil resistance and the prevention of major atrocities
    16. The use and impact of new technologies in civil resistance struggles
    17. Failure of civil resistance in crucial cases/campaigns: lessons learned
    18. Recovering historical cases of civil resistance struggles that are unknown or under-researched
    19. Nonviolent resistance to coups d’état
    20. Comparative studies of recent civil resistance cases in a region or across regions, with emphasis on Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific region
    21. Studies of the situations in which civil resistance is justified and appropriate and situations in which it may be misused or used by repressive actors
    22. The role of nonviolent resistance strategies in international solidarity movements in support of nonviolent struggles

     

    Frequently Asked Questions from Last Year’s Application Process

    Q: Can you please specify how official the [department letter indicating current year of Ph.D. studies and the expected date (month/year) of the thesis completion and submission] must be and what form it may take? Must it be authored by the chair of my department or may it instead come from my thesis advisor? May it be submitted as a certified email from one of these two individuals or is a scanned copy of a signed letter required?

    A: The departmental letter or a letter signed by the academic advisor must state the current year of Ph.D. studies and expected graduate date (month/year) and its scanned copy can be attached to the online application.

    *****

    Q: How strictly does the 18 months Ph.D. graduation rule apply?

    A: 18 months before the official thesis submission is a necessary minimum.  ICNC would like to have a chance of working with the awardee to enrich the fellow’s writing with a civil resistance perspective. This cannot be done at the end of a student’s Ph.D. work.  We believe that a minimum of 18 months gives ICNC and an awardee needed time to review and integrate necessary civil resistance literature into the thesis, or conduct field research relevant to civil resistance and develop a draft related to civil resistance for a peer-review publication.

    *****

    Q: The required 1000 word writing sample that applicants are asked to submit—should this come from the piece that we hope to or will potentially be working to publish with the mentorship of the ICNC advisor?

    A: No, the writing sample must come from a different unedited piece than the piece that you hope ICNC will support publishing.

    *****

    Q: Could the piece of ‘unpublished writing’ be a sample from a Master’s or Ph.D. thesis?

    A: This is acceptable as long as the text did not undergo external copyediting

    *****

    Q: The RFP states that the writing sample should not be a literature review but does not say whether this should be written as a more academic piece, a popular piece, how closely it should be related to the topic of the application, etc.

    A:  It should be an unpublished academic, policy or journalistic piece that demonstrates the applicant’s English-language writing and reasoning skills and, if applicable, applicant’s research, evidence, and case study-related skills.  This unpublished piece does not need to relate thematically to the application.

    *****

    Q: How often do awardees meet with ICNC advisors? Does mentorship require travel to the DC area?

    A: Mentorship could be done via Skype, over the phone or email. We aim to assign around 10 hours of mentorship to be used during the fellowship, though we aim to put in touch an awardee with a selected academic mentor soon after the fellowship is awarded.

    *****

    Q: I am based outside of the US and the model of study here consists solely of the preparation of an independent piece of research, so I don’t have a transcript indicating grades earned thus far—would it be better to attach an academic transcript from my MA program (which did include grades) or the results of my MA dissertation, or to just include a note explaining the situation?

    A: Including a note into the online application or uploaded document explaining the situation with grading will suffice.

    *****

    Q: Does the PhD transcript need to be an official copy from the university registrar or can it be an unofficial copy with the same information?

    A: Unofficial copy of a Ph.D. transcript is acceptable.

    *****

    Q: It seems that you’ve cast your “this is what we’re interested in” net quite broadly—can you confirm that [the topic I’ve described] will be of interest to you?

    A: We cannot comment on the substantive part of the applicant’s proposal. It is up to each applicant to determine whether his or her research on a specific issue fits within the realm of ICNC’s research interests. Please make sure to consult the ICNC priority research themes and additional topics of interest.

    *****

    Q: I am a newly-minted graduate, currently adjuncting at a community college. It is not a tenure track, nor am I “junior faculty.” Is this a category that is covered by this award?

    A: ICNC accepts applications from part time post-doctoral candidates

    *****

    Q: There is no provision for activists who do not have Masters or PhD degrees as of yet but who have equal research experiential learning, making them eligible to apply for your fellowship. Is that correct?

    A: Correct. Unfortunately, applicants that are not Ph.D. students, post-doctoral or junior faculty are not eligible for ICNC’s PhD, Post-Doctoral  & Junior Faculty Research Fellowship. However, we encourage practitioners interested in civil resistance to consider applying for other opportunities with ICNC.

    *****

    Q: Can you confirm whether a junior fellowship application can use the funds of the fellowship to employ a full-time research assistant (e.g. for three months)?

    A: The fellowship must be arranged directly between ICNC and the selected fellow. No third party can be included in this contractual relationship.

    *****

    Q: How open is the organization to funding requests/applications for domestic projects?

    A: Our preference is for comparative or multi-case research, both domestic and international, directly related to civil resistance and preferably to one of our priority topics.

    *****

    Q: What is the time period for which the fellowship will be given i.e. for a month or a year or two years etc.?

    A: The time period for which the fellowship will be given varies from fellow to fellow, though on average it is a 12-18 month period.

    *****

    Q: Does the scholar have to be present at the ICNC center in Washington or is it expected that the scholar will do his/her research in their home country?

    A: Fellows do not reside at ICNC. An awardee is expected to do research/writing at a place(s) where he/she has access to the information and data needed for the study that the fellowship supports.

    *****

    Q: I am working on popular grassroots movements and would like to do fieldwork. I would like to expand my doctoral thesis to write a book. What is included in the budget, i.e. can I include my fieldwork expenses/ visit to libraries as part of the budget justification?

    A: The budget for the fellowship should include expenses that directly support data collection, analysis and writing related to the study that the fellowship will be awarded for.

    *****

    For more info click here

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